February 19, 2015

February 19

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1793 One Cent

1793 One Cent

Good Morning Semmes

February 19

I know my career is going badly because I’m being quoted correctly.

Lee Marvin, born Feb. 19, 1924

Today is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.
There are 315 days remaining until the end of the year (316 in leap years).

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Useless Facts Of The Day

  • In 1060 a coin was minted in England shaped like a clover. The user could break off any of the four leaves and use them as separate pieces of currency.
  • During the American revolution, inflation was so great that the price of corn rose 10,000 percent, the price of wheat 14,000 percent, the price of flour 15,000 percent, and the price of beef 33,000 percent.
  • The first coins struck by the U.S. Mint are “half dimes”, believed to be made from silverware provided by George and Martha Washington. The first circulating coins are copper cents.

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Today In History

  • 2008 Fidel Castro resigns as President of Cuba
  • 1985 William J. Schroeder becomes the first recipient of an artificial heart to leave hospital
  • 1945 Battle of Iwo Jima – about 30,000 United States Marines land on the island of Iwo Jima
  • 1942 T President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the executive order 9066, allowing the United States military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps
  • 1878 Thomas Edison patents the phonograph
  • 1847 The first group of rescuers reaches the Donner Party
  • 1846 In Austin, Texas the newly formed Texas state government is officially installed. The Republic of Texas government officially transfers power to the State of Texas government following the annexation of Texas by the United States.
  • 1807 Former Vice President of the United States Aaron Burr is arrested for treason in Wakefield, Alabama and confined to Fort Stoddert.

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Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see a shadow.
Helen Keller

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Stir-Fried Green Rice, Eggs, and Ham (Turkey Ham)

Directions

1. Combine brown rice and 4 ½ cups water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to low. Cover and cook until water is absorbed, about 30-40 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Add salt to rice. Mix well. Set aside. A rice cooker may be used with the same quantity of brown rice and water.
2. Drain water from spinach by squeezing thawed spinach with hands. Set aside.
3. Whisk together eggs and 1 Tbsp water.
4. Cook half of the eggs in a large nonstick skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray. Remove eggs from skillet to cool. Chop cooled eggs and set aside. Reserve the
remaining eggs for step 6.
5. Heat vegetable oil in a wok or a large nonstick skillet over high heat. Add ham and cook for 2 minutes or until ham begins to brown.
6. Reduce heat to medium. Add brown rice and toss to mix. Add remaining eggs. Stir for 5 minutes or until egg is fully cooked.
7. Add green onions, spinach, chopped egg, sesame oil, and soy sauce. Stir well. Cook until thoroughly heated. Serve hot.

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For Your Garden

Propagate some new plants from cuttings
Continue planting cool season vegetables like: broccoli, cabbage, kale, lettuce, onions
Harvest winter crops before they bolt
Plant out cold hard annuals like: pansies and Icelandic poppies
Start seeds of warm season vegetables and flowers
Begin dividing perennials
Plant bare root roses and fruit trees
Finish pruning roses and fruit trees

  • Lettuce
    Start a crop of salad mix greens that gets bright sun but not all day. Great for spring crops until the lettuce begins to bolt in the summer sun.
  • Onions
    Get those onion seeds growing. Plant short day onions.
  • Peppers
    A garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. Start seeds 8-10 weeks before your last frost date indoors for best results.
  • Tomatoes
    The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Grow a few new varieties every year to find your favorites! Start seeds 6-8 weeks before your last frost date indoors for best results.

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Poor Richard’s Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of “Poor Richard” or “Richard Saunders” for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from 1732 to 1758. It was a best seller for a pamphlet published in the American colonies; print runs reached 10,000 per year.

“Love your Enemies, for they tell you your Faults.” 
Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanack

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My name will be great among the nations, from the rising to the setting of the sun. In every place incense and pure offerings will be brought to my name, because my name will be great among the nations,” says the LORD Almighty.  

Malachi 1:11

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“The Congress shall have the Power… To Coin Money”

U.S. Mint in Philadelphia

U.S. Mint in Philadelphia

When the framers of the U.S. Constitution created a new government for their untried Republic, they realized the critical need for a respected monetary system. Soon after the Constitution’s ratification, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton personally prepared plans for a national Mint. On April 2, 1792, Congress passed The Coinage Act, which created the Mint and authorized construction of a Mint building in the nation’s capitol, Philadelphia. This was the first federal building erected under the Constitution.

1794 Large Cent

1794 Large Cent

President George Washington appointed Philadelphian David Rittenhouse, a leading American scientist, as the first Director of the Mint. Under Rittenhouse, the Mint produced its first circulating coins — 11,178 copper cents, which were delivered in March 1793. Soon after, the Mint began issuing gold and silver coins as well. President Washington, who lived only a few blocks from the new Mint, is believed to have donated some of his own silver for minting.

  • Jan. 1793 A “Dog for the Yard” is purchased for $3 by the Mint as protection
  • March 1793 The first circulating coins – 11,178 copper coins – are delivered.
  • October 1795 The first two women are employed in the Mint to work as adjusters.
  • 1797 The Mint in Philadelphia closes in the summer and autumn due to outbreaks of yellow fever.
  • 1799 The Mint becomes an independent agency reporting directly to the President.

History

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