Sons Of Liberty and The Boston Tea Party

Sons Of Liberty and The Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773 Samuel Adams organized about 60 members of the Sons of Liberty, his underground resistance group to converge on Boston Harbor disguised as Mohawk Indians and board three British ships and dump 342 chests of tea into the harbor. The group’s “Boston Tea Party,” was in protest of the British Tea Act, a bill designed to save the faltering East India Company by greatly lowering its tea tax and granting it a virtual monopoly on the American tea trade. Three ships, the Dartmouth, the Eleanor, and the Beaver, were boarded by the Sons Of Liberty and the Massachusetts colonists dumped 342 containers of tea into the harbor.  

"Rat" and Elaine Dearmon

A Humbling Experience

“A HUMBLING EXPERIENCE”
Another Letter to The Editor

“In Grateful Appreciation to “Rat” and Elaine Dearmon for Their Many Years of Selfless Service with the Semmes Volunteer Fire Department Serving and Protecting the Citizens of Semmes”

 

It can be a humbling experience witnessing ordinary citizens banding together for their community to set right an injustice….and humbling it was last night in Semmes as I looked around at the faces of the men gathered outside of the Semmes Volunteer Fire Station No. 1 on Wulff road. It was very clear from the mood among these gentlemen that they were determined to liberate these stations last night not only to safe guard the citizens of Semmes but, to honor the memory of a family and a man that they had looked up to in this community when they were just young boys.  I had been asked to be there by Mr. Mickey Dearmon in order to provide photographic documentation of the conditions of the stations and any equipment that was found inside. Called into service again by their ex-chief, Mickey Dearmon, these men rallied to his side after Mr. Dearmon worked tirelessly to obtain court documents granting him as acting SVFD Fire Chief, the power to seize both Fire Station No. 1 and Fire Station No.

Did You Know? George Washington Launched a Submarine

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Sept. 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — The Yankee experimental submarine, code named Turtle, was launched against the British warship, HMS Eagle, on September 6, 1776.  In the attack, the submarine attempted to attach an underwater bomb, but was forced to withdraw when the corkscrew tethered to the explosive wouldn’t penetrate the warship’s hull.   The submarine made a similar attempt later against the HMS Phoenix with the same results.  In the end, however, success was achieved when a standalone torpedo, perfected in the secret program, was used by Colonial commandos to sink a British sloop. Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160831/403054

Details of the submarine’s development were uncovered by examining letters from the inventor, David Bushnell, and correspondence between Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklinand George Washington. You can read about the clandestine program along with British attempts to foil the submarine in a recently published book, “Washington’s Undersea War,” by Shawn Shallow, Gatekeeper Press. Submarine Construction

The process began when a brilliant Yale student, David Bushnell, designed the rudimentary submarine before recruiting his brother Ezra and a local craftsman Isaac Doolittle for actual construction.  Working in secret, they produced a working submarine, round and almost six feet in height, with a brass head containing eight small glass windows.  Early attempts to operate the machine underwater met with multiple problems including total darkness for the operator.  Rumors of the invention reached George Washington who arranged for funds to perfect the underwater machine and train a military pilot, Ezra Lee. On the evening of September 6, 1776; Washington launched the Turtle in an attack of the HMS Eagle.  When unable to attach the underwater bomb, the Turtle was forced to return to the surface where it was spotted by British guards on Governor’s Island New York who gave chase in a rowboat.  In response, the pilot Ezra Lee, detonated the torpedo between himself and his pursuers to affect his escape.  A second attempt followed against the H.M.S. Phoenix with similar results.

Brooklyn Bridge Opens In 1883

After 14 years and 27 deaths while being constructed, the Brooklyn Bridge over the East River is opened, connecting the great cities of New York and Brooklyn for the first time in history. Thousands of residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan Island turned out to witness the dedication ceremony, which was presided over by President Chester A. Arthur and New York Governor Grover Cleveland. Designed by the late John A. Roebling, the Brooklyn Bridge was the largest suspension bridge ever built to that date.