February 17, 2015

February 17

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Interstate Highway System

Interstate Highway System

Good Morning Semmes

February 17

I don’t care who ya are, that’s funny right there”

Larry the Cable Guy, born Feb. 17, 1963

Today is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.
There are 317 days remaining until the end of the year (318 in leap years).

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Useless Facts Of The Day

  • Babies are born without kneecaps. They don’t appear until the child is 2-6 years of age.
  • The dot over the letter “j” or “i” is called a “tittle.”
  • Our eyes are always the same size from birth, but our nose and ears never stop growing.

Today In History

  • 1959 First weather satellite is launched
  • 1933 Prohibition in the United States is ended by the Blaine Act
  • 1933 Newsweek is published for the first time
  • 1865 Columbia, South Carolina is burned as Confederate forces flee from advancing Union forces
  • 1864 The H.L. Hunley becomes the first submarine to engage and sink a warship, the USS Housatonic
  • 1801 An electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr ir resolved when Jefferson is elected President of the United States and Burr Vice President by the United States House of Representatives
  • 1753 In Sweden, February 17 is followed by March 1 as the country moves from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar
  • 1621 Myles Standish is appointed as first commander of the English Plymouth Colony in North America

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Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.

Francis of Assisi

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Soak 1½ pints of split peas over night; next day add 2¼ quarts water and the vegetables, cut fine; also the sugar, salt and pepper and cook slowly three hours; now mash through sieve. If it boils down too much add a little water. After putting through sieve place on stove and add hot milk and cream. If it is not thin enough to suit add more milk.

Stock may be used if same is available.

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For Your Garden

Propagate some new plants from cuttings
Continue planting cool season vegetables like: broccoli, cabbage, kale, lettuce, onions
Harvest winter crops before they bolt
Plant out cold hard annuals like: pansies and Icelandic poppies
Start seeds of warm season vegetables and flowers
Begin dividing perennials
Plant bare root roses and fruit trees
Finish pruning roses and fruit trees

  • Lettuce
    Start a crop of salad mix greens that gets bright sun but not all day. Great for spring crops until the lettuce begins to bolt in the summer sun.
  • Onions
    Get those onion seeds growing. Plant short day onions.
  • Peppers
    A garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. Start seeds 8-10 weeks before your last frost date indoors for best results.
  • Tomatoes
    The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Grow a few new varieties every year to find your favorites! Start seeds 6-8 weeks before your last frost date indoors for best results.

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Poor Richard’s Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of “Poor Richard” or “Richard Saunders” for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from 1732 to 1758. It was a best seller for a pamphlet published in the American colonies; print runs reached 10,000 per year.

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Three may keep a secret if two of them are dead.
Benjamin Franklin

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Interstate Highway System

Interestate Highway System

Interestate Highway System

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate) is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. The system is named for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who championed its formation. Construction was authorized by the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, and the original portion was completed 35 years later. The network has since been extended, and as of 2012, it had a total length of 47,714 miles (76,788 km), making it the world’s second longest after China’s. As of 2011, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. The cost of construction has been estimated at $425 billion (in 2006 dollars).

As one of the components of the National Highway System, Interstate Highways improve the mobility of military troops to and from airports, seaports, rail terminals, and other military bases. Interstate Highways also connect to other roads that are a part of the Strategic Highway Network, a system of roads identified as critical to the U.S. Department of Defense.

The system has also been used to facilitate evacuations in the face of hurricanes and other natural disasters. An option for maximizing traffic throughput on a highway is to reverse the flow of traffic on one side of a divider so that all lanes become outbound lanes. This procedure, known as contraflow lane reversal, has been employed several times for hurricane evacuations. After public outcry regarding the inefficiency of evacuating from southern Louisiana prior to Hurricane Georges’ landfall in September 1998, government officials looked towards contraflow to improve evacuation times. In Savannah, Georgia, and Charleston, South Carolina, in 1999, lanes of I-16 and I-26 were used in a contraflow configuration in anticipation of Hurricane Floyd with mixed results.

In 2004 contraflow was employed ahead of Hurricane Charley in the Tampa, Florida area and on the Gulf Coast before the landfall of Hurricane Ivan; however, evacuation times there were no better than previous evacuation operations. Engineers began to apply lessons learned from the analysis of prior contraflow operations, including limiting exits, removing troopers (to keep traffic flowing instead of having drivers stop for directions), and improving the dissemination of public information. As a result, the 2005 evacuation of New Orleans, Louisiana, prior to Hurricane Katrina ran much more smoothly.

A widespread urban legend states that one out of every five miles of the Interstate Highway System must be built straight and flat so as to be usable by aircraft during times of war. Contrary to popular lore, Interstate Highways are not designed to serve as airstrips.

Interstate 10 (I-10) is the southernmost transcontinental highway in the American Interstate Highway System. It stretches from the Pacific Ocean at State Route 1 (SR 1) (Pacific Coast Highway) in Santa Monica, California to I-95 in Jacksonville, Florida. This freeway is part of the originally planned Interstate Highway network that was laid out in 1956, and its last section was completed in 1990. I-10 is the fourth longest Interstate Highway in the United States, following I-90, I-80, and I-40, with about 1⁄3 of its length within the state of Texas, where the freeway spans the state at its widest breadth.

I-10 crosses over the border from Jackson County, Mississippi, and it goes through Mobile County in southwestern Alabama. In Mobile, I-10 is the southern terminus of I-65. In downtown Mobile, I-10 goes through one of the few highway tunnels in Alabama, the George Wallace Tunnel under the Mobile River.

The speed limit of the eastbound approach is posted at 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) because of the sharp curve approaching the tunnel. The highway then crosses approximately 8 miles (13 km) of the upper part of Mobile Bay on the Jubilee Parkway, a bridge that local people call the “Bayway”. The highway is next to Battleship Parkway. On the other side of Mobile Bay, the highway goes through the suburban area of Baldwin County before passing through Malbis, Loxley, and then on to the Perdido River to cross over it into Florida.


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